Ginger

My name is Ginger Lynd. I was diagnosed in 2021 with a neuroendocrine tumor behind my right eye.

I firmly believe that you don’t have to have an inoperable tumor anymore. You can have proton therapy and get rid of it.

I was at risk of losing my optic nerve and going blind until learning that proton therapy was an option. I had a tumor behind my right eye that was resting on the optic nerve, causing my eye to protrude. After a few sessions of proton therapy in September, my eye is going back to where it belongs due to the tumor is shrinking. 

I was at risk of losing my optic nerve and going blind until learning that proton therapy was an option.

People must be brave and share their stories. My cousin had prostate cancer eight years ago and was treated at Oklahoma Proton Center. He experienced no pain, no chemo, no surgery, and no lack of function. He wasn’t ashamed to tell anyone he had prostate cancer. He was brave enough to let everybody know. Because of him, I was able to ask about proton therapy when my oncologist and my ocular surgeon suggested radiation. With the location of my tumor being close to my brain, I wanted a treatment that would spare the surrounding tissues and organs and have less collateral damage. Unlike conventional radiation that passes through the tumor, proton therapy is able to stop inside the tumor with pinpoint accuracy. This means less damage to healthy tissue and organs and fewer side effects. Proton therapy was the best choice for my overall health.

Coming to the Oklahoma Proton Center was a great experience. The architecture of the building is beautiful and it gave me great joy. However, the people inside the building were the real reason for my happiness. Their smiles and attitudes made me feel I was among true friends who were always there for me and helped me get well. From the very first phone call I made to the Center until my last day of treatment, I was supported.

I was among true friends who were always there for me and helped me get well...”

Since completing my proton therapy treatment, there is no longer a risk of me going blind. I’m able to remain an independent person.

My advice to anyone who has been diagnosed with a tumor is to be your own advocate. Ask questions. No matter where you live, you should be able to go to a proton center and get treated.

Be your own advocate.

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